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OTHER TRADITIONAL DANCE
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Dersingham Scottish Dance Group
Meetings: Meets in the Methodist Chrch Hall almost every Wednesday at 7.45pm to 9.45 pm
Contact: Mary Andrews 01553 761798
Website:
Email:
Verified: 19th Aug 2006
Longham Scottish Dancing Group
Meetings: Meets at Longham Village Hall every Thursday 7.30pm to 9,45 pm
Admission: £2
Contact: Di or Fred 01328 700002 0r 01603 868197
Website:
Email:
Verified: 19th Aug 2006
Norwich Early Dance Group
Meetings: Thursday 7.30pm. Avenue Middle School
Admission:
Contact: Harriet Cox 01603 458447
Website: www.norwichearlydance.org.uk
E-mail: enquiries@norwichearlydance.org.uk
Verified:
Norwich International Folk Dance
Meetings: Tuesday, St Alban's Church Hall, Grove Walk.
Admission:
Contact: Claire Shearman 01603 458525
Verified:
Norwich Pied-à-Terre French folk dance
Meetings: First Wednesday of the month 8.15 - 11.00pm. Kier Hardie Hall, St Gregory's Alley. Also have a french tunes instrumental session from 7.30pm at the start of each dance session. Free admission for musicians except on guest nights.
Admission: Club Nights £4.00 Concessions £3.00
Contact: Sarah Bates 01603 768463 or 07849 050612
E-mail: sj.bates@yahoo.co.uk
Website: www.piedaterre.me.uk
Verified: 03.11.2012
Norwich Reel SocietyScottish country dancing.
Meetings: Second and fourth Wednesdays of the month. United Reformed Church Hall, Unthank Road.
Contact: Janice McKellar 01603 717898
Verified:
Irish Society of East Anglia Set Dance classes
Venue: Manor Rooms, The Street, Trowse, NR14 8ST Time: 20:00 - 22:00 Tea and biscuits provided Cost £2 Dates: 26th January, 23rd February, 23rd and 30th March, 27th April
Contact: Peter Jackson 01986 897082 for more information

Irish Set Dancing History Set dancing is a form of social dancing which has been popular in Ireland for over 150 years. Sets are danced by four couples in a square, and usually consist of three to six figures with a short pause between each. They are descended from the French quadrilles, which were brought to Ireland by the British army in the nineteenth century. Irish dancers adapted the figures to their own music and steps to form dances with great enjoyment
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